Feb 26, 2021  
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog [Archived Catalog]

Courses


 
  
  •  

    AC 141 - Financial Accounting


    Introduces accounting principles and practices applicable to the preparation and analysis of financial statements of a business organization.  Major topics include the accounting cycle, classification of elements of financial statements (assets, liabilities, equity), measurement of income, and preparation and analysis of financial statements.

    Credits: 4

    Notes: No credit given for AC-141 if credit has been given for BU-115.

  
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    AC 143 - Managerial Accounting


    Covers the preparation and use of accounting information to support managerial planning, control and decision making. Introduces cost classification and behavior concepts, cost-volume-profit analysis, the use of budgets, cost-control systems, standard costs, variance analysis, cost-based decision making, and cash flows.

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: Prior Completion of or Concurrent Enrollment in AC-141 or BU 103 or BU 113.
     

    Notes: Accounting majors and minors will take AC 141-Financial Accounting instead of BU 103.

  
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    AC 221 - Intermediate Accounting I


    Two-semester examination of financial accounting concepts and theories, the financial reporting process, financial statements, and accounting for asset, liability, and shareholders’ equity accounts in greater depth.  Topics also include time value of money, accounting for investments, bonds, leases, and income taxes, plus earnings per share and financial disclosures.

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: AC-141, Minimum Grade B or Permission of Instructor.

  
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    AC 223 - Intermediate Accounting II


    Two-semester examination of financial accounting concepts and theories, the financial reporting process, financial statements, and accounting for asset, liability, and shareholders’ equity accounts in greater depth.  Topics also include time value of money, accounting for investments, bonds, leases, and income taxes, plus earnings per share and financial disclosures.

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: AC 221; AC Majors and Minors Only.

  
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    AC 243 - Cost Management


    Examines the role of both cost management and cost management information in organizational strategy and success.  Topics explore the practical application of cost management information, including the tools and techniques used to promote critical and effective decision making.

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: AC 143

    Notes: Required for accounting majors and recommended for business majors with an interest in the accumulation and use of cost relevant to the decision-making process.

  
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    AC 250 - Nonprofit Accounting


    This course provides students with a fundamental understanding of the financial accounting, reporting, and stewardship issues pivotal to nonprofit organizations. Nonprofits constitute a significant portion of the American economy, and engage in an array of important undertakings, from education, research, religion, health/welfare, social activities, and professional pursuits.

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: AC-143 or Permission of the Instructor

  
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    AC 321 - Finance


    AC-321 is the first required finance course for the Accounting major. The course provides an overview of key finance principles and practices relevant to business decision-making and presents students with the finance tools necessary to develop the knowledge and skills currently in demand by employers.
     

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: AC-143 and EC-101  and (BU-103 or BU-113 or AC-141) and (MA/ST-120 or MA/ST-140 or MA/ST-251 or EC-205 or PS-213 or PS-216); AC Majors and Minors Only; Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors Only.

  
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    AC 351 - Advanced Accounting


    Review of advanced topics in accounting theory and practice.  Topics may include accounting for business combinations, foreign currency and international accounting issues, and the formation, operation and termination of partnerships.

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: AC 223

  
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    AC 369 - Financial Management


    An upper level course which teaches model building and quantitative methods used by financial professionals. Financial knowledge acquired in AC 321 Finance will be enhanced through its application to cases involving cash flow, capital budgeting, financial statement analysis, the cost of capital calculation, company valuation, merger analysis, etc.

     

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: AC 321

  
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    AC 415 - Federal Income Taxation


    Introduction to federal income tax law as it applies to individuals, with some corporate and partnership tax concepts.  The course focuses on computing federal income tax liabilities and identifying opportunities in federal income tax law to minimize income taxes. Emphasizes problem solving and application of tax concepts to practical scenarios. 

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: AC Majors and Minors Only; Juniors and Seniors Only.

  
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    AC 425 - Capital Budgeting


    This course further develops the capital budgeting introduced in AC 321 - Finance and explores the effect of real asset investment decisions on corporate strategy and firm performance.  The  focus is on applied decision-making.  Topics include advanced techniques in capital budgeting, option pricing and strategies, the real option approach to capital budgeting.
     

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: AC 321 or BU-216 with a minimum grade of B-.

  
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    AC 450 - Seminar in Accounting


    Capstone course in the Accounting major.  Topics build upon accumulated accounting knowledge to further develop the capacity to analyze, research, write about and present accounting topics, consider standards of professional ethics and the influence of current events. The course also addresses the commitment to lifelong learning inherent in the profession. 

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: AC-451; Juniors and Seniors Only; AC Majors and Minors Only.

    Notes: Fulfills Written Communication requirement for the Accounting major.

  
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    AC 451 - Auditing


    Introduction to the fundamentals of auditing.  Topics include professional standards which govern the performance of audit services and a review of concepts and procedures critical to successful performance of a financial statement audit, from risk assessment through audit reporting. 

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: AC 223 and Senior standing.

  
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    AC 490 - Advanced Topics in Accounting


    This advanced topics course addresses contemporary issues in accounting. Specific information about a topic being offered in a given semester can be obtained from the faculty member offering the course or the department chair.

    Credits: Variable

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: Senior standing

    Notes: May be repeatable as long as the topic is different.

  
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    AH 251 - Ancient and Medieval Art


    Examination of early human achievement in the arts, from the cave paintings of Lascaux to the Gothic cathedrals. Special attention is given to methods of analyzing form and subject matter, and ideology in art and architecture.

    Credits: 4

    LSC/Core: Historical Studies/ Literature & The Arts

  
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    AH 252 - Renaissance and Modern Art


    Students learn to analyze art, and to see, think, write and speak critically about painting, sculpture, and empowered objects from the fifteenth through twentieth centuries in Europe, America, and West Africa. Throughout the course, we analyze art through changing thematic lenses. Stylistic elements, the role of art in society, and the judgment of what is good, are persistent themes.

    Credits: 4

    LSC/Core: Historical Studies/ Literature & The Arts

  
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    AH 280 - Culture and Society in Medieval Burgundy


    An 18-day academic study-abroad course in Burgundy, France, focusing on the historical, political, artistic, religious, literary, cultural, and social developments of medieval Burgundy. Based in Pontigny, students travel every other day to cities, abbeys, castles, cathedrals, museums, and archaeological sites which are examined in preparatory classes.

    Credits: 4

    LSC/Core: Historical Studies AND Study of Christian Traditions and Thought/ Literature & The Arts AND Catholic Intellectual Traditions

    Notes: Optional Applied Language Component.

  
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    AH 333 - Art Since 1960


    This course is a survey of art movements since 1960, such as Minimalism, Fluxus, Pop, Conceptual Art, Performance, Video and Digital Art. Art we encounter today can be ephemeral, temporary, conceptual, and/or installation based. We will examine the shift away from conventional art object production as well as the shifting role of the artist during this period. Classroom discussion will be central to the course and students should be prepared to engage with readings, visit off campus art institutions and have guest artist lecturers.

    Credits: 4

    LSC/Core: NA/ Literature & The Arts OR Junior Seminar

    When Offered: Fall
  
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    AH 347 - Saints, Kings and Barbarians


    This course will focus on images of power, piety, and belief in the European Middle Ages (c.200 - 1066), from the Late Antique world to Charlemagne and his successors. Rural landscapes, town planning, and the role of archeology in understanding medieval art and life will be explored, along with the evolution of including churches, mosques, monasteries, cathedrals, palaces and houses, and the objects and images that filled them.

    Credits: 4

    LSC/Core: Study of Christian Traditions and Thought/ Literature & The Arts AND Catholic Intellectual Traditions

  
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    AH 348 - Castles and Cathedrals: Art of the High Middle Ages


    This course will focus on images of power, piety, and belief in the European High Middle Ages (c. 900 - c. 1400), from Charlemagne and the Carolingian contribution to late Gothic and Marco Polo’s travels. The achievements of the Romanesque style in the great monasteries, and the development of the Gothic cathedrals will be explored, as will the objects and images that filled these buildings - mosaics, sculpture, paintings, reliquaries, illuminated manuscripts, metalwork, jewelry, stained glass.

    Credits: 4

    LSC/Core: Study of Christian Traditions and Thought/ Literature & The Arts AND Catholic Intellectual Traditions

  
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    AH 381 - Topics in Art History


    Examines in-depth topics selected from various areas of art and/or art architectural history. Course descriptions for sections will be announced prior to registration.

     

    Credits: 4

    Notes: May be repeatable as long as the topic is different.

  
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    AL 101 - Introduction to Language and Linguistics


    This course provides an introduction to the nature and structure of human language, as well as the basic methods of its scientific study. The course is framed in terms of four guiding questions: what are the components of the language system; how do we acquire this system; how is this system used in society; and how is this system represented in the brain.

    Credits: 4

    LSC/Core: Social and Institutional Dimensions of Human Behavior/ History & Society

    Notes: Optional Applied Language Component

  
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    AL 103 - Structure of the English Language


    This course will give students the tools for talking about English grammar - the grammar they may already know and use. Once they become familiar with these tools or “metalanguage,” they will use them to explore how different grammatical choices are used strategically to make meaning, and how these choices can improve writing and speaking performance for both native and non-native speakers.

    Credits: 4

  
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    AL 220 - Languages of the World


    This course introduces the linguistic, sociopolitical, and economic effects of language contact over time. The Indo-European family illustrates typological principles which students then apply to other languages and their status on the world’s stage, focusing on the role of languages in globalization and the impact of globalization on language evolution.

    Credits: 4

    LSC/Core: Global Issues that Impact the Common Good/ NA

    Notes: Optional Applied Language Component, 2 credits.

  
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    AL 250 - Intercultural Communication


    This course explores the challenges of becoming interculturally competent in a global world. The course examines the relationship between communication and culture, applies theoretical concepts to the analysis of cultural patterns and communication phenomena, and examines how different cultural perceptions and symbol systems can alter the communication event in a variety of contexts. The course includes a critique of the intercultural communication experience through a case study analysis.

    Credits: 4

    LSC/Core: Global Issues that Impact the Common Good/ Engaging Diverse Identities

  
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    AL 310 - Methodology of Second/Foreign Language Teaching


    This course covers principles and methods of second and foreign language learning and teaching. A practical experience component includes classroom observations, peer micro-teaching, and opportunities to instruct small groups of ESL or FL students. This course is useful for foreign language majors, language education majors, and students interested in teaching ESL/EFL.

    Credits: 4

  
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    AL 410 - TEFL/TESOL Practicum


    The TEFL/TESOL Practicum is an intensive, four-week professional training program (120 hours) leading to a professional certificate in Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL) or Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL). It covers all essential aspects of English language teaching from a practical classroom perspective. It offers concrete experience with methods and techniques, reflecting current communicative principles of language teaching and learning. This program is ideal for new entrants to the field, as well as for working teachers who wish to gain a professional qualification or to update their methodology. Although this is an undergraduate course, students who opt to complete an extended capstone project may also earn six credits of advanced standing toward the SMC MATESOL program, subject to all other eligibility requirements.

     

    Credits: 4

    When Offered: Summer

  
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    AM 101 - Introduction to American Studies


    Using a case study approach, this course exposes students to a sample of the broad range of sources and methods that are to be found in the history, literature, politics, religion, art, and popular culture of America. Possible course themes include the 1930s, 1950s, 1960s, slavery, the Civil Rights Movement, women’s rights, and the frontier.

     

    Credits: 4

    LSC/Core: Literary Studies or Historical Studies/ History & Society

  
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    AM 201 - Topics in American Studies


    This course provides a case study in interdisciplinary approaches to a single topic related to American culture, past or present.

    Credits: 4

    LSC/Core: NA/ Engaging Diverse Identities

  
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    AM 220 - On Looking


    Starting from the premise that ways of seeing are historically and culturally situated, this course will explore fields of vision in nineteenth-century America. How did new photographic technologies and advances in the field of optics change the ways Americans viewed their bodies and surroundings? How do individuals register and theorize shifts in attention and perspective?

    Credits: 4

    LSC/Core: NA/ Literature & The Arts

  
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    AM 225 - American Childhood


    This course employs the interdisciplinary methods of American Studies to explore the representation and experience of childhood in America, past and present.

    Credits: 4

    LSC/Core: NA/ History & Society

  
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    AM 227 - Foundations of US Latinx Literature and Culture


    Concepts, themes, genre conventions, and major historical events and figures significant in Latinx literature and cultures of the United States.

    Credits: 4

    LSC/Core: Global Issues or Historical Studies or Literary Studies/ Literature & The Arts AND Engaging Diverse Identities

  
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    AM 229 - Introduction to Cuban Literature and Culture


    This class will introduce students to key works, topics, and contexts for understanding Cuban literature and culture in historical perspective.

    Credits: 4

    LSC/Core: Global Issues that Impact the Common Good or Historical Studies or Literary Studies/ Literature & The Arts AND Engaging Diverse Identities

  
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    AM 350 - Locating American Studies: Theory and Methodology


    This junior-level course introduces majors to current methodologies, theories, and interpretive strategies in the field of American Studies, including cultural studies, cultural geography, popular culture, material culture, gender studies and film studies. The focus will be on varied critical texts suggesting the evolving, interdisciplinary nature of American Studies.

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: At least junior standing.  In semesters when AM 350 is not offered, students may take EN 325 (Critical Theory) or HI 393 (Historigraphy).  Other alternatives may be possible with permission of the Director.

  
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    AM 380 - American Publics


    This seminar will investigate the identities and agendas of various “publics” in contemporary American life. What are the popular and political dimensions of the “public sphere,” and how does participation relate to citizenship?

    Credits: 4

  
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    AN 109 - Introduction to Cultural Anthropology


    An introduction to the principles and processes of cultural anthropology. The course not only provides students with basic insights into facts and theories, but also, most importantly, the anthropological attitude of a commitment to understanding and tolerating other cultural traditions.

     

    Credits: 4

    LSC/Core: Global Issues that Impact the Common Good or Social Institutional Dimension of Human Behavior/ History & Society AND Engaging Diverse Identities

    Notes: No credit given for AN-109 if credit has been given for AN-110.

  
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    AN 110 - Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (CEL)


    An introduction to the principles and processes of cultural anthropology. The course not only provides students with basic insights into facts and theories, but also, most importantly, the anthropological attitude of a commitment to understanding and tolerating other cultural traditions.

    This course includes a substantial community-engaged learning component and students will spend a significant amount of time doing fieldwork in the wider Burlington community. The course fulfills the “Experiential Learning”(EL) component of the Liberal Studies Curriculum.

     

    Credits: 4

    LSC/Core: Global Issues that Impact the Common Good or Social and Institutional Dimensions of Human Behavior/ NA

    Notes: No credit given for AN-110 if credit has been given for AN-109 or SO-109.

  
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    AN 209 - Research Methods of Anthropology


    This course introduces students to the research methods used by anthropologists and sociologists when conducting qualitative research. The course will provide an overview of qualitative research, and students will gain practice in gathering data by means of interviews, ethnographic strategies, historical and oral histories. The course will also examine a variety of films and books that have used qualitative approaches.

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: AN 109 or AN 110

    Notes: Fulfills Written Communication requirement for the Anthropology track.

  
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    AN 217 - Social Inequalities


    An examination of inequalities in wealth, power and privilege in the United States and other cultures.

    Credits: 4

    LSC/Core: NA/ History & Society AND Engaging Diverse Identities

  
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    AN 233 - Youth, Global Media and Indigenous Culture in the Himalayas


    An exploration of the processes of globalization and pressure to modernize among youth in the Himalayan Buddhist cultures of Ladakh, northern India and Bhutan, by focusing on the influence of television, tourism and internet.  Required for summer India trip “Media Nomads: Youth Television Trekking in the Buddhist Himalayas” June 2015.

    Credits: 2

  
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    AN 235 - Peoples and Cultures of the Lusophone World


    Introduces students to the unique perspective that anthropology and the ethnographic method bring to our understanding of cultural history, national identity, and the legacies of Portuguese colonialism around the world. Class approximates cultural immersion as much as possible, relying primarily on a deep reading of class ethnographies and contemporary fiction from the Portuguese speaking world.

    Credits: 4

    LSC/Core: Global Issues that Impact the Common Good/ NA

  
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    AN 310 - Advanced Topics in Anthropology


    This course enables students to explore a contemporary anthropological issue through the utilization of ethnography and ethnology. Past topics have included: Indigenous Knowledge; The Refugee Experience in America, and Applied Anthropology. Topics vary based on current research interests of the professor.


     

    Credits: Variable

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: Previous or Concurrent Enrollment in AN 109 or AN 110 or SO-101 or Permission of Instructor.

    LSC/Core: Global Issues that Impact the Common Good/ NA

    Notes: May be repeatable as long as the topic is different. May be offered as a full or half course depending on topic.

  
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    AN 333 - Anthropology of Refugees


    An exploration of the cultural, economic and political conditions that lead refugees and internally displaced people to leave their country of origin. We will examine the quality of life, tensions and social issues that arise in refugee camps and the “receiving” communities effected by displacement processes, as well as issues around repatriation in various countries. We will also explore the ways American refugees struggle with and respond to the process of being Americanized as well as issues around refugee health, in particular, the assumptions social service providers make in trying to heal refugees.

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: AN 109 or AN 110

    LSC/Core: NA/ Engaging Diverse Identities

  
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    AN 335 - Media Nomads: Youth, Television and Trekking in the Buddhist Himalayas


    Students explore the processes of globalization and the pressure to modernize among youth in Ladakh, northern India, a Himalayan Buddhist community.  Research will focus on Buddhist youth, the influence of television, tourism and global media.  Students divide time between living at a high school teaching media literacy workshops/conducting student interviews, and trekking. 

    Credits: 2

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: AN 233

    LSC/Core: Global Issues that Impact the Common Good/ NA

  
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    AN 341 - Culture, Illness, and Healing


    An overview of the sub-field of medical anthropology providing a detailed look at culture, health and healing in several different cultures. In this course we apply an anthropological perspective to the study of illness, health and healing cross-culturally. We explore how different cultures decide what are normal and abnormal states of mind and body and how they “should” be healed. How is the body a symbolic template for collective categories and values? This is also a course within the fields of psychological and anthropology of religion. We also consider how American notions of body, self and mind increasingly shape the expression of mental illness around the globe and the ongoing relationship between globalization and Western psychologization. We explore the migration of certain forms of healing from East to West and how they change in the process of becoming Americanized. In the process of exploring other cultural conceptions of health and healing, we will question and critically examine American assumptions about health, healing, the self and sickness.

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: AN 109 or AN 110

  
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    AN 355 - Anthropology of International Development


    How do development anthropologists understand poverty, progress, and social change in the Global South? Utilizing the comparative method, class will examine challenges faced globally by boys, girls, women, and men . Students will become familiar with social/cultural analysis and the policies and programs which emerge from them.

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: AN 109 or AN 110 or GS 101 or GS 203

  
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    AN 420 - Capstone in Anthropology


    Senior-level seminar in which students conduct substantial anthropological research in the local community. Enables students to reflect on their entire undergraduate experience.

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: (AN-109 or AN-110) and SO-101 and (AN-209 or AN-393).

  
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    AR 115 - Digital Animation


    This studio art course will teach students the technical, artistic and professional skills essential to the production of digital animation. Students will begin with simple introductory exercises that build in complexity, culminating in a short animated film.

    Credits: 2

    LSC/Core: Artistic Experience/ Literature & The Arts

  
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    AR 127 - Ceramics I: Wheelworking


    Will provide students with a comprehensive introduction to the practice of throwing on the potters wheel including clay preparation, centering, formation of vessels, trimming, glazing and firing. We will also look at the work of historical and contemporary ceramic artists.

    Credits: 4

    Fee: Yes

    LSC/Core: Artistic Experience/ Literature & The Arts

    Notes: The course meets at Burlington City Arts Clay and Craft Studio.

  
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    AR 201 - Foundations in Art


    Foundations in Art introduces basic contemporary art practices in two and three dimensions. Students will explore the making, presenting, and analyzing of art works in a variety of media including drawing, sculpture, and photography.

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: Majors Only; First-Year Students Only.

    LSC/Core: Artistic Experience/ Literature & The Arts

  
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    AR 204 - Introduction to Graphic Design


    This course will instruct students in the fundamentals of graphic design for print and web-based output. This is a production-based course with an emphasis on the formal and informational possibilities of visual design elements and typography.

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: AR Majors/Minors Only or Permission of Instructor. (Open to all students during Open Registration period).

    LSC/Core: Artistic Experience/ Literature & The Arts

  
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    AR 205 - Drawing I


    Students will develop skills in mark making, formal visual principles, and abstract thought through assignments that survey different approaches to Drawing.

     

     

    Credits: 4

    LSC/Core: Artistic Experience/ Literature & The Arts

  
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    AR 208 - Mixed Media


    Mixed Media explores making art with a variety of materials. Students will experiment with non-digital art making techniques: pencil/ink drawing, stenciling, screen-printing, acrylic transfers, and paper marbling. In the second half of the semester students will make a body of work using multiple technical and conceptual approaches.

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: AR-201 OR AR-205 OR Permission of Instructor

    LSC/Core: Artistic Experience/ Literature & The Arts

  
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    AR 209 - Painting with Oil


    In this course students develop skills working with paint, two dimensional formal principles, and abstract thought through assignments that survey different approaches to oil painting.

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: AR 201 or AR 205 or Permission of Instructor.

    LSC/Core: Artistic Experience/ Literature & The Arts

  
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    AR 214 - Digital Animation and Motion Graphics


    Digital Animation & Motion Graphics moves students with little or no knowledge of digital image creation and manipulation through the steps necessary to create animation, motion graphics,and video composites useful in web, television, gallery, mobile, and cinematic applications.

    Credits: 4

    LSC/Core: Artistic Experience/ Literature & The Arts

  
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    AR 215 - Digital Imaging


    An introduction to basic techniques and strategies for using digital imaging hardware and software for the production of both screen-based and printed artworks.

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: Art Majors/Minors only or Permission of Instructor

    LSC/Core: Artistic Experience/ Literature & The Arts

  
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    AR 219 - Painting with Acrylic


    In this course, students develop skills working with paint, two-dimensional form principles, and abstract thought through assignments that survey different approaches to acrylic painting.

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: AR 205 or Permission of the Instructor.

    LSC/Core: Artistic Experience/ Literature & The Arts

  
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    AR 225 - Sculpture: Subject and Object


    This course is an introduction to basic sculptural materials and techniques, foundational formal concepts specific to sculpture, and the development of three-dimensional artworks.

    Credits: 4

    LSC/Core: Artistic Experience/ Literature & The Arts

  
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    AR 235 - Sculpture: Site and Installation


    This course is an introduction to creating site-based, three-dimensional artworks using a wide range of sculptural techniques and materials. The course will focus on instructing students how to make artworks outside the confines of the studio and gallery.

    Credits: 4

    LSC/Core: Artistic Experience/ Literature & The Arts

  
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    AR 261 - Kyoto, Japan: Aesthetic Perspective on Place


    This half course offers students both background on the unique aesthetic quality that permeates Japanese art, design, architecture, sense of place, education, and spirituality as well as engagement in the creative process and artistic activities in media that will be experienced in the  summer study program to Japan.

    Credits: 2

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: Permission of Instructor

    LSC/Core: Artistic Experience/ Literature & The Arts

  
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    AR 262 - Kyoto, Japan: Summer Study Trip


    In this two week course based in Kyoto students will be immersed in the rich aesthetics of Japan.  By visiting temples, gardens, schools, and arts studios, sampling sense of place and cuisine, and witnessing contrasts between tradition and modernity students will be inspired to engage in their own creative process.

    Credits: 2

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: AR-261

    LSC/Core: Artistic Experience/ Literature & The Arts

  
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    AR 301 - Woodworking Design & Construction


    An introduction to foundational design principals and fine woodworking techniques relevant to the production of custom, heirloom quality wood furniture. Students will be instructed in the safe use of a range of tools and techniques used for fine woodworking.

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: AR-225 or TH-161 or Permission of Instructor.

  
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    AR 315 - Digital Video Art


    This course is an introduction to basic techniques and strategies for using digital video cameras and professional digital video editing software for the production of video art.

    Credits: 4

    LSC/Core: Artistic Experience/ Literature & The Arts

  
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    AR 330 - Introduction to Darkroom Photography


    This course is designed as an introduction to the black-and-white photographic process as a means of visual expression. Students will learn to use the manual functions for a 35mm camera, process their own film, make prints in the darkroom and present their work in an art critique setting.

    Credits: 4

    Fee: Yes

    LSC/Core: Artistic Experience/ Literature & The Arts

  
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    AR 332 - Eco and Environmental Art


    This course will lead students to an understanding of interdisciplinary artwork that can be defined as EcoArt or Environmental Art through creative production, research, and analysis. These terms describe artworks created over the past 40 years that focus primarily on ecological or environmental issues.

    Credits: 4

    LSC/Core: Artistic Experience/ Literature & The Arts OR Junior Seminar

    Crosslisted: ES-332

  
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    AR 335 - Introduction to Digital Photography


    This course is designed as an introduction to digital photography as a means of visual expression.  Students will learn to use the manual functions of a DSLR camera, shoot in RAW, upload images using Adobe Bridge, edit files with Photoshop, make digital prints and present work in an art critique setting.

    Credits: 4

    LSC/Core: Artistic Experience/ Literature & The Arts OR Junior Seminar

  
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    AR 340 - Intermediate Photography


    This course is designed as a continuation of the introductory photography course (AR 130), with an emphasis on the crossover between traditional film processes and digital technology. Students will be exposed to new photographic formats, alternative darkroom techniques, and will be challenged to develop and refine their individual voices as art photographers. The culmination of the course will be an in-depth final portfolio that will be presented in an art gallery setting.

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: Either AR 330 (formerly AR 130) or AR 335

    Fee: Yes

    LSC/Core: Artistic Experience/ Literature & The Arts

  
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    AR 382 - Topics in Studio Art


    Examines in-depth topics selected from various areas of studio art. Course description and credit count for sections will be announced prior to registration.

    Credits: Variable

    Notes: May be repeatable as long as the topic is different.

  
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    AR 408 - Junior Studio


    This course will guide students toward developing an independent studio art practice.  Specific projects will be based on individual student interests with directed guidance and thematically relevant assignments from faculty.  Students will also learn to develop research and professional practices in connection with the production of their art.

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: Art Majors Only; Juniors Only or Permission of Instructor.

    LSC/Core: Artistic Experience/ Literature & The Arts

    When Offered: Fall
  
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    AR 415 - Senior Studio


    An individually planned studio program resulting in a thesis exhibition of a significant body of related works. Exhibitions will be in the McCarthy art gallery or another appropriate space on campus to be decided in consultation with faculty.

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: Majors Only; Seniors Only or Permission of Instructor.

    LSC/Core: Artistic Experience/ Literature & The Arts

  
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    BI 106 - Topics in Cellular and Molecular Biology


    This lecture and laboratory course will focus on topics pertaining to the cellular level of biological organization. Examples of specific topics that may be explored in a given semester are: the cellular basis of health and disease; human genetics and inheritance; cancer; biotechnology, including the study of the moral implications of the rapidly evolving technology; the immune system; origin of life; reproduction and development.

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: Not open to Biology/Biochemistry/Environmental Science/Neuroscience/Pre-Pharmacy Majors or Biology Minors.

    Fee: Dependent on Topic

    LSC/Core: Processes of Scientific Reasoning/ Scientific Inquiry

    Notes: This course is a laboratory course designed for students who are not science majors and may not be counted toward the biology major or minor.

  
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    BI 108 - Topics in Organismal Biology


    This lecture and laboratory course will emphasize scientific modes of inquiry through the study of topics pertaining to the organismal level of biological organization. Examples of specific topics that may be explored in a given semester are: human biology; animal behavior; embryology of plants and animals; physiological responses of plants and animals to the environment; the biology of a particular group of organisms, for example, plants, invertebrates, microorganisms, and human parasites.

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: Not open to Biology/Biochemistry/Environmental Science/Neuroscience/Pre-Pharmacy Majors or Biology Minors.

    Fee: Dependent on Topic

    LSC/Core: Processes of Scientific Reasoning/ Scientific Inquiry

    Notes: This course is a laboratory course designed for students who are not science majors and may not be counted toward the biology major or minor.

  
  •  

    BI 110 - Topics in Evolutionary or Ecosystem Biology


    This lecture and laboratory course will emphasize scientific modes of inquiry through the study of topics pertaining to the population level of biological organization. Examples of specific topics that may be explored in a given semester are: evolution; conservation biology; endangered species and the loss of biodiversity; climate change; food and energy resources; types of pollution and their impact on various ecosystems; human population growth; natural history of Vermont.

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: Not open to Biology/Biochemistry/Environmental Science/Pre-Pharmacy Majors or Biology Minors.

    Fee: Dependent on Topic

    LSC/Core: Processes of Scientific Reasoning/ Scientific Inquiry

    Notes: This course is a laboratory course designed for students who are not science majors and may not be counted toward the biology major or minor.

  
  •  

    BI 151 - Introduction to Ecology and Evolution


    This course introduces ecology and evolution. Our approach is problem- and inquiry-based. Lectures, case studies, and discussions present biological concepts relevant to real world problems. Labs promote hypothesis testing and experimental design during semester-long projects. Students develop proficiency with scientific reasoning and learn the importance of biological principles in the natural world.

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: Open to (Biology, Biochemistry, Environmental Science, Environmental Studies, Neuroscience and Pre-Pharmacy Majors) and Biology Minors Only.

    Fee: Yes

    LSC/Core: Processes of Scientific Reasoning/ Scientific Inquiry

    When Offered: Fall
  
  •  

    BI 152 - Introduction to Health Science


    Introduces students to the study of human health, including the effects of stress on physiology, the ecology and evolution of infectious disease, the functions of the immune system, factors that impact the prevention and treatment of chronic disease, and contemporary issues in health sciences.  Labs promote proficiency with scientific reasoning and biological principles as they relate to human health and disease.

    Credits: 4

    Fee: Yes

    LSC/Core: Processes of Scientific Reasoning/ Scientific Inquiry

    Notes: This course is designed for students interested in the following majors: Health Science, Biology, and Neuroscience.

  
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    BI 153 - Introductory Cell Biology and Genetics


    Introduces the disciplines of cellular biology, genetics, and molecular biology. Our approach is problem- and inquiry-based. Lectures, case studies, and discussions present biological concepts relevant to real world problems. Labs promote hypothesis testing and experimental design. Students develop proficiency with scientific reasoning and learn the importance of biological principles in the natural world.

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: (BI-151 or BI-152 or PB-101) Minimum Grade C- or Permission of Instructor.

    Fee: Yes

    LSC/Core: Processes of Scientific Reasoning/ Scientific Inquiry

    Notes: Required for biochemistry, biology and pre-health care career students; others by permission of the department.

    When Offered: Spring
  
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    BI 205 - Communications in the Biological Sciences


    This course will help students (1) develop skills in locating, reading, and evaluating professional literature in the biological sciences ; (2) develop skills in presenting scientific research or other biological information orally and in writing; and (3) improve their ability to statistically evaluate, analyze, and present biological data.

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: (BI-151 or BI-152 Minimum Grades C-) and (BI-153 Minimum Grade C); Biology/Neuroscience/Pre-Pharmacy Majors Only.

    Notes: Group discussions and individual consultations. Fulfills writing intensive requirement for the Biology and Neuroscience majors.

  
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    BI 207 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I


    Students will study the structures of the vertebrate body and will also learn how vertebrate structure has been modified over evolutionary time. The primary focus will be on mammalian, including human, anatomy.

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: (BI-151 or BI-152 Minimum Grades C-) and (BI-153 Minimum Grade C).

    Fee: Yes

    When Offered: Fall
  
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    BI 215 - Epidemiology


    Epidemiology is the science of public health. Disease shapes local communities worldwide and our interconnected global community fosters the fast spread of worldwide pandemic disease.   Topics include etiology of infectious and chronic disease, disease patterns and determinants, study designs, association and causation, and global public health issues.

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: (BI-151 or BI-152 or PB-101 Minimum Grades C-) and (BI-153 Minimum Grade C);

    LSC/Core: Global Issues that Impact the Common Good/ NA

    When Offered: Fall
  
  •  

    BI 219 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II


    A comprehensive study of human physiology that will include all major organ systems.  The laboratory explores fundamental concepts of human physiology in a hands-on manner that includes data collection and analysis, a formal lab report including relevant literature, and a student-designed project.

     

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: (BI-151 or BI-152 Minimum Grades C-) and (BI-153 Minimum Grade C) and (CH-110 or CH-103).

    Fee: Yes

    When Offered: Spring
  
  •  

    BI 222 - Population and Evolutionary Genetics


    Study of the principals of classical (Mendelian) genetics, population and evolutionary genetics, and human genetics.  Topics will include the chromosomal and molecular basis of inheritance, transmission genetics, genetics of natural populations, evolutionary mechanisms (i.e. genetic drift, mutation, and selection), ecological genetics, and genetic analysis of human health and disease. 

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: (BI-153 Minimum Grade C) and (CH-110 or CH-103)

    Fee: Yes

    When Offered: Fall
  
  •  

    BI 223 - Molecular Genetics


    The study of gene structure, function and regulation. Lecture topics include chromosomes, transcription and translation, replication, gene regulations, genetic variation, epigenetics, recombinant DNA technologies, and the molecular processes that govern genome evolution. The laboratory explores how molecular techniques are used to answer questions in this field.

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: (BI-151 or BI-152 Minimum Grades C-) and (BI-153 Minimum Grade C) and (CH-110 or CH-103) and (CH-117 or CH-204).

    Fee: Yes

    When Offered: Spring
  
  •  

    BI 225 - Cell Biology


    The study of cell structure and function. Topics include cellular biochemical processes, cell membranes, organelles, the cytoskeleton, nuclear function, cell division, and cell behavior. Lecture and laboratories will emphasize an experimental and quantitative approach.

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: (BI-151 or BI-152 Minimum Grades C-) and (BI-153 Minimum Grade C) and CH-110 and CH-117 or Permission of Instructor; Sophomores and Juniors Only.

    Fee: Yes

    When Offered: Fall
  
  •  

    BI 230 - General Microbiology


    BI 230 covers foundational microbiological topics in a comprehensive 200-level course.  This course surveys the diverse microbial world, emphasizing the role of prokaryotes in health and disease, the environment, and biotechnology.  Laboratories focus on experimental design in bacteriology and provide a solid foundation in microbiological techniques.
     

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: (BI-151 or BI-152 Minimum Grades C-) and (BI-153 Minimum Grade C) and CH-110 and CH-117 or Permission of Instructor.

    Fee: Yes

    Notes: Credit cannot be granted for both BI 230 and BI 315

  
  •  

    BI 235 - Topics in Biology


    Different specific topics will be offered and all will be intended primarily for sophomore biology majors; specific topics will depend on program needs and faculty expertise.

     

    Credits: 4

    Fee: Dependent on Topic

    Notes: May be repeatable as long as the topic is different.

  
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    BI 238 - Ecosystem Ecology


    This field course examines the structure and composition of terrestrial ecosystems and how geology, climate, humans, and other factors affect ecosystem distribution and sustainability. Included is an historical overview of human effects on ecosystems including climate change. Field trips examine mountaintops, a bog, lake side forests, coniferous and hardwood forests.

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: (BI-151 or BI-152 Minimum Grades C-) and (BI-153 Minimum Grade C) or Permission of Instructor.

    Fee: Yes

    When Offered: Fall
  
  •  

    BI 242 - Community Ecology


    This course covers the biology of ecological communities. The course emphasizes biological diversity measurement, preservation, and human influences on biological communities. Core concepts include keystone species, dominant species, disturbance effects, and species co-occurrence. Approach includes assigned readings with hands-on investigation in the field and laboratory. Communities of aquatic habitats are emphasized.

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: (BI-151 or BI-152 Minimum Grades C-)

    Fee: Yes

    LSC/Core: Global Issues that Impact the Common Good/ NA

    When Offered: Fall
  
  •  

    BI 247 - Plant Biology


    The course considers the evolution, diversity, structure, and internal processes of plants with an emphasis on angiosperms. The relationships humans have with plants are explored through our food stream, breeding practices, and genetic engineering. Laboratories consist of field work in The Teaching Gardens and hypothesis driven experiments.

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: (BI-151 or BI-152 Minimum Grades C-) and (BI-153 Minimum Grade C) or Permission of Instructor.

    Fee: Yes

    When Offered: Fall
  
  •  

    BI 250 - Tropical Ecology


    The course consists of five meetings during the fall semester and a two-week study tour examining the tropical ecology of three Costa Rican ecosystems (rain forest, cloud forest and dry forest) during winter break. Students will generate questions from observations, followed by conducting research projects to address the ecological questions.

     

    Credits: 2

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: (BI-151 or BI-152  Minimum Grades C-) and Permission of Instructor.

    Notes: Enrollment by application, limited to space available. Admission is selective based upon academic performance and potential to be a responsible and contributing group member during the work in Costa Rica. Travel costs must be paid by students and are not covered by their financial aid packages.

  
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    BI 253 - Coral Reef Ecology


    Coral reefs are coastal marine ecosystems that are among the most complex, diverse and fragile on our planet. This half-course will cover the application of basic ecological principles to this unique ecosystem, an introduction to the species endemic to the community, and a discussion of the major threats to the ecosystem, both natural and anthropogenic.

    Credits: 2

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: (BI-151 or BI-152 Minimum Grades C-) or ES-107; Juniors and Seniors Only.

    LSC/Core: Process of Scientific Reasoning/ Scientific Inquiry

    Notes: Must complete both BI253 and BI254 to earn LSC or CORE credit

    Crosslisted: ES-253

    When Offered: Fall
  
  •  

    BI 254 - Coral Reef Ecology Field Trip-Cuba


    An 11-day field course studying the coral reefs on the North and South Shores of Cuba. The course will focus on the ecology, behavior and interrelatedness of the tremendous variety of organisms living in association with a coral reef. Group work and research project.

     

    Credits: 2

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: BI 253

    LSC/Core: Process of Scientific Reasoning/ Scientific Inquiry

    Notes: Must complete both BI253 and BI254 to earn LSC or CORE credit

    Crosslisted: ES-254

    When Offered: Fall
  
  •  

    BI 255 - Human Evolution


    An introduction to human biological and cultural evolution. We will explore our relationships with other primates and trace the evolution of our lineage over the past several million years highlighting key points on our evolutionary path.

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: (BI-151 or BI-152 Minimum Grades C-) or Permission of Instructor; Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors Only; Biology and Sociology/Anthropology Majors Only

    Fee: Yes

    LSC/Core: Scientific Reasoning/ Scientific Inquiry

    When Offered: Spring
  
  •  

    BI 260 - Animal Behavior


    The study of ethology: animal behavior from an evolutionary perspective. Class sessions explore mechanisms of behavior, development of behavior, and behavioral ecology of animals from a wide range of taxa. The laboratory work involves development of strong observational skills and execution of analytical research. Field trips to off-campus locations are required.

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: (BI-151 or BI-152 Minimum Grades C-).

    Fee: Yes

  
  •  

    BI 303 - Exercise Physiology


    This course will cover more advanced topics in human physiology that are specifically relevant to exercise.

    Credits: 2

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: BI 219 or BI 319/can be taken concurrently with permission of instructor.

     

     

    When Offered: Alternating spring semesters in the odd years

  
  •  

    BI 315 - Microbiology


    Microorganisms impact our lives and environment in many ways. This 300-level course focuses on the structure, metabolism, growth, genetics, health impacts, and evolution of microorganisms including viruses. The laboratory component of our course will explore microbiological techniques used to study and identify microorganisms.

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: (BI-151 or BI-152 Minimum Grades C-) and (BI-153 Minimum Grade C0 and (CH-110 or CH-103) and (CH-117 or CH-204) and (CH-207 or CH-208) and (BI-222 or BI-223).

    Fee: Yes

    Notes: Credit cannot be granted for both BI 230 and BI 315

    When Offered: Fall
  
  •  

    BI 318 - Cellular/Molecular Neuroscience


    This course covers cellular/molecular aspects that govern signal transmission. We explore the actions of venoms and drugs on neurons, neurotransmitter systems and signal processing in sensory systems. Other topics include development and the phylogenetic diversity of nervous systems. During lab we employ commonly used methods in cellular/molecular neuroscience.

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites/Restrictions:  (BI-151 or BI-152 Minimum Grades C-) and (BI-153 and CH-110 and CH-117 Minimum Grades C) or Permission of Instructor.

    Fee: Yes

  
  •  

    BI 320 - Neuroscience: Physiology/Behavior


    A comprehensive study of physiological processes underlying information processing in the brain, with an emphasis on humans. The lecture will consist of investigations of the electrophysiological properties of neurons, as well as the functional roles of important regions of the brain. The laboratory will include anatomy, modeling, and experiments.

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: (BI-151 Minimum Grade C-) and (BI-153 and CH-110 Minimum Grades C) or Permission of Instructor.

    Fee: Yes

  
  •  

    BI 321 - Comprehensive Biochemistry


    This is a one semester biochemistry course geared to students who are particularly interested in pursuing careers in medicine and health related fields. The course will cover the major categories of biomolecules (peptides/proteins, carbohydrates, nucleic acids, and lipids) and the major metabolic pathways, all with a focus on human health and medicine.

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: CH-207, CH-208 and (BI-153 Minimum grade C).

  
  •  

    BI 323 - Molecular Genetics for PPH


    This course exposes students on the Pre-Pharmacy track to gene structure, function and regulation. Lecture topics include chromosomes, transcription and translation, replication, gene regulations, genetic variation, epigenetics, recombinant DNA technologies, and the molecular processes that govern genome evolution. The laboratory explores how molecular techniques are used to answer questions in this field.

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: (BI-151 or BI-152 Minimum Grades C-) and (BI-153 Minimum Grade C) and (CH-110 or CH-103) and (CH-117 or CH-204) and permission of instructor.

    Fee: Yes

  
  •  

    BI 325 - Molecular Biology


    The study of information flow from DNA to protein.  Lecture topics include chemistry of DNA, RNA, and proteins; organization of genes, chromosomes, and genomes; transcription and translation; gene regulation; epigenetics; DNA replication; and genome evolution.  The laboratory explores how molecular biology techniques are used to clone and characterize novel genes.

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites/Restrictions: (BI-151 or BI-152 Minimum Grades C-) and (BI-153 Minimum Grade C) and (CH-110 or CH-103) and (CH-117 or CH-204); (BI-223 or BI-225 recommended).

    Fee: Yes

    When Offered: Spring
 

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